Department of Social Work supports 14th Annual Memorial March to Honor Lost Children

March to Honor Lost Children

SIOUX CITY, Iowa — Advocates for Native American children will host a free educational workshop on Nov. 22 at Briar Cliff University, leading up to the 14th annual “Memorial March to Honor Lost Children.”

Participants are eligible to receive Continuing Legal Education (CLE) or Continuing Education Unit (CEU) hours, free of charge.


The goal of the march is to raise awareness and ultimately reunite displaced Native American children with their home tribes and families.

—Elizabeth Rembold, assistant professor of social work


Each year, in the days before Thanksgiving, hundreds of people gather in downtown Sioux City for the Memorial March to Honor Lost Children, an event that remembers Native American children who have been taken from their families and communities and placed in the country's non-native child welfare system. 

On Nov. 22, the day before the actual march, Native American leaders and activists will lead the free workshop at Briar Cliff to examine the legal and social challenges facing today’s Native American children. One of this year’s speakers will be Native American advocate Nora Boesem, who will speak about her experiences as a foster mother of native children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

The march itself will take place on the morning of Nov. 23 in downtown Sioux City. It begins at 7:30 a.m. at the War Eagle Monument, followed by prayer stops at the Jackson Women and Children’s Recovery Center (8:30 a.m.), Siouxland Center for Active Generations (9:30 a.m.), Sioux City Public Museum (10:30 a.m.) and the Woodbury County Courthouse (noon). The March rounds off at 1 p.m. with a free traditional memorial dinner at Four Directions Center.

“The goal of the march is to raise awareness and ultimately reunite displaced Native American children with their home tribes and families,” said Elizabeth Rembold, program director and assistant professor of social work at BCU. “While great things have happened during these marches, such as family members finding each other and reuniting after years of separation, the march functions mainly as a way to get people together to pray for protection from a system that has abused native children.”

Additional information about the event and workshops can be found at briarcliff.edu/MarchForLostChildren.



Tags: BCU, Academics, Service, Social Work, Campus Ministry